This course sequence is designed for students in the master's program who wish to work with a faculty advisor to conduct significant, original independent research in the field of applied and computational mathematics (each course is one semester). A sequence may be used to fulfill two courses within the 700-level course requirements for the master's degree; only one sequence may count towards the degree. For sequence 625.801-802, the student will produce a technical paper for submission to a journal or to a conference with accompanied refereed proceedings. The intent of the research is to expand the body of knowledge in the broad area of applied mathematics, with the research leading to professional-quality documentation. Students with a potential interest in pursuing a doctoral degree at JHU, or another university, should consider enrolling in either this sequence or 625.803-625.804 to gain familiarity with the research process (doctoral intentions are not a requirement for enrollment).
Course prerequisites: 
Completion of at least six courses towards the Master of Science, including 625.401 Real Analysis and/or 625.409 Matrix Theory, 625.403 (Statistical Methods and Data Analysis), and at least one of the following three two-semester sequences: 625.717-718 Advanced Differential Equations: Partial Differential Equations and Nonlinear Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems, 625.721-722 Probability and Stochastic Processes I and II, or 625.725-726 Theory of Statistics I and II). It is recommended that the sequence represent the final two courses of the degree
Course notes: 
The student must identify a potential research advisor from the Applied and Computational Mathematics Research Faculty (ep.jhu.edu/acm-research) to initiate the approval procedure prior to enrollment in the chosen course sequence; enrollment may only occur after approval. A full description of the process and requirements can be found at ep.jhu.edu/acm-process.
Course instructor: 
Member of ACM Research Faculty
Course all programs: 
Applied and Computational Mathematics