Applied and Computational Mathematics

The Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals Applied and Computational Mathematics program will prepare you to solve problems in diverse areas such as defense technology, business, public policy, and biomedicine.

Program Pages Content

Degrees & Pathways

Focus Areas/Tracks
Applied AnalysisInformation Technology and ComputationOperations ResearchProbability and StatisticsSimulation and Modeling

About

Connecting applied mathematics and computational methods is a smart move, especially considering the increasing need to incorporate design and implementation of mathematical algorithms into modern technologies. Faculty employ the latest tools, housed in modern computing facilities, to blend practical instruction with theoretical principles, setting students on a course to be leaders in this growing field.

Upon completing the degree program, students will:

  1. Understand basic terms, concepts, and notation of mathematical logic and reasoning.
  2. Understand the distinction between axioms, definitions, and theorems.
  3. Understand and construct proofs of theorems at the level studied in the course.
  4. Solve basic probability problems, including finding properties of distribution functions.
  5. Understand how to determine point and interval estimates in statistics.
  6. Solve for, and interpret, simple regression models.
  7. Employ statistical software confidently for topics addressed in this course.
  8. Learn and use fundamental matrix algebra concepts.
  9. Understand basic notions and limitations of numerical computation (round-off error, stability of algorithms, operation counts).

Requirements

Master's Degree

Admission Requirements

  • You must meet the general admission requirements that pertain to all master's degree candidates.
  • Your prior education must include (1) at least one mathematics course beyond multivariate calculus (such as advanced calculus, differential equations, or linear algebra); and (2) familiarity with at least one programming language (e.g., Java, Python, C++, R, or MATLAB). (Undergraduate courses are offered to provide mathematical background for the program. These 200-level courses are not for graduate credit. Some students may find one or more of these courses useful as a refresher or to fill gaps in their training.)
  • A detailed work résumé must be submitted.
  • When reviewing an application, the candidate’s academic and professional background will be considered.
  • If you are an international student, you may have additional admission requirements.

Degree Requirements

  • Ten courses must be completed within five years.
  • The curriculum consists of four core courses (including a two-term course) and six electives.
  • The six electives must include at least four from the program (625.xxx), with at least two of the four courses at the 700-level. Students are required to take at least one 700-level course outside of the core sequences (625.717/718, 625.721/722, and 625.725/726). An independent study (625.800), research project (625.801–802), or thesis (625.803–804) may be substituted for one or two of the 700 level courses outside of the 700 level core sequence. A student who has taken at least one year of undergraduate statistics or one semester of graduate statistics (outside of Applied and Computational Mathematics) may substitute another 625.xxx course for 625.403 with approval of the student's advisor. A student who has taken at least one year of undergraduate statistics or one semester of graduate statistics (outside of Applied and Computational Mathematics) may substitute another 625.xxx course for 625.403 with approval of the student's advisor.
  • Focus areas are not required for this program.
  • Only one grade of C may count toward the master's degree.
  • All course selections are subject to advisor approval.

Post-Master's Certificate

Admission Requirements

  • You must meet the general admission requirements that pertain to all post-master's certificate candidates.
  • It is expected that applicants will have completed courses equivalent to 625.403 Statistical Methods and Data Analysis, and at least 625.401 Real Analysis or 625.409 Matrix Theory in prior graduate coursework.
  • Students with long-standing interest in pursuing PhDs through the Applied Mathematics and Statistics (AMS) Department in the full-time program should coordinate their course plans with their Applied and Computational Mathematics advisor and with a representative in the AMS Department. Certain courses within Applied and Computational Mathematics may be especially helpful in passing the required entrance examination for the PhD program. Priority of admission is not given to graduates of the Applied and Computational Mathematics program for the PhD program.
  • If you are an international student, you may have additional admission requirements.

Certificate Requirements

  • Six courses must be completed within three years.
  • At least four of the six courses must be from the Applied and Computational Mathematics program (numbered 625.480 or higher). At least three of the courses must be at the 700-level, and at least one of the 700-level courses must be outside of the sequences 625.717/718, 625.721/722, and 625.725/726.
  • Students are allowed to take one mathematically oriented elective course from outside the program. Courses 625.401 Real Analysis, 625.403 Statistical Methods and Data Analysis, and 625.409 Matrix Theory may not be counted. An independent study (625.800), research project (625.805–806), or thesis (625.807–808) may be substituted for one or two of the 700 level courses outside of the 700 level core sequence.
  • Only grades of B− or above can count toward the post-master's certificate.
  • Focus areas are not available for students pursing certificates.
  • All course selections are subject to advisor approval.

Courses

Please refer to the course schedule published each term for exact dates, times, locations, fees, and instructors.

COURSES BY FOCUS AREAS

The focus areas offered represent related groups of courses that are relevant for students with interests in the selected areas. The focus areas are presented as an aid to students in planning their course schedules and are generally applicable to students seeking a master’s degree; the more advanced courses within each focus area may also apply to the post-master’s certificate. Focus areas are not required for this program. They do not appear as official designations on a student’s transcript or diploma.

APPLIED ANALYSIS

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMPUTATION

OPERATIONS RESEARCH

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

SIMULATION AND MODELING

ELECTIVES

Two electives may be from the program or from another graduate program provided the courses have significant mathematical content. Electives from outside of the program must be approved by an advisor.

Program News

Top Instructors Receive 2017 Faculty Awards
April 18, 2017

During the 2017 spring faculty meeting held at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins Engineering honored ten outstanding online and part-time instructors for their dedication in the classroom this past year.

U.S. News & World Report Ranks JHU's Online Engineering Programs Among Nation's Best
January 12, 2017

In the latest rankings from U.S. News & World Report, released January 10, 2017, the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering maintained its spot in the top twenty-five schools in the country in the categories of Best Online Graduate Engineering Programs and Best Online Graduate Computer...

Top Instructors Receive 2016 Faculty Awards
April 5, 2016

During a faculty meeting held at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory on March 16, we honored twelve Johns Hopkins Engineering instructors for their dedication and innovation in the classroom.

Balancing teaching with their own careers, our instructors work tirelessly to provide an educational experience that is both challenging and highly relevant for today's students.

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